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Course Catalog

 

GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION

GRADING POLICIES
Report cards with progress grades are issued every six (6) weeks.  A semester consists of three (3) 6-week grading periods.  Semester grades are posted on a student’s permanent record (transcript).  The final examination may count for no more than 20% of the final semester grade.  The grading scale is:

PERCENTAGE

LETTER GRADE

90% - 100%

A

80% - 89%

B

70% - 79%

C

60% - 69%

D

0% - 59%

F

 

Credit is granted for successful completion of each class at the end of the semester.  Progress reports are issued every 6 weeks prior to the end of the semester and reflect the cumulative grades for each class. Credits are granted with passing grades: A, B, C, or D. Credit is not granted for grades of “F”, “I” (Incomplete) or “W/F” (withdrawal with the grade of F).  Course work must be completed by the end of the semester following the semester in which the “I” (Incomplete) is posted. If a grade is not assigned for the Incomplete within the next semester, a grade of F will be assigned. If a course is repeated, the higher grade will be recorded and computed in the student’s grade point average (GPA); however, the F remains on the transcript.  Duplicate credit will not be granted for a course that is repeated.

Dual credit (courses taken at Central New Mexico Community College/University of New Mexico/Institute of American Indian Arts or SIPI) grades are included on the transcript and calculated in the GPA.  It is a state requirement that dual credit grades be posted on the high school transcript.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES
Students taking courses will have a “no fault” withdrawal when:

  1. This process has started within the first 10 (ten) school days.
  2. A student/parent/teacher/counselor conference is held within the 2nd to 3rd week of the school year.  The goal of the conference is to develop a Support Plan for Student Success in the course.
  3. A minimum of two weeks is allowed for implementation of the support plan.
  4. A student/parent/teacher/counselor conference is held at the end of the support plan for student success timeframe.  The goal of the conference is to determine if the plan has been successful and what further actions need to be taken.  In addition, schedule change implications are discussed (changes in instructors, changes in class periods, appropriate course level changes, options for a substitute class, open periods and class load limits).

If the student is not successful after implementation of a support plan, the student or teacher may make a request to the curriculum assistant, no later than the end of the first six weeks, for withdrawal (without penalty) from the course.

  • The transfer process occurs no later than the first seven (7) weeks of the semester, but no sooner than the 4th week of the semester.
  • The student will be transferred to the level of the course that is appropriate for his/her academic skill level* or courses that fulfill a graduation requirement (e.g.; Algebra I will replace Honors Algebra I, English 9 will replace Honors English 9, Chemistry I will replace AP Chemistry).
  • When examining transfer options, class load maximums cannot be violated. The grade that the student earned in the course at the time of withdrawal will transfer to the new course.  The transfer grade will not be weighted if the grade was from an AP or honors course.

Students who withdraw from a course after the first 10 days of each semester, and do not enroll in a comparable* course (same content) will receive a WF (Withdraw Fail) on their transcript.

*  When a course does not exist in the same content area (e.g. There is not an Environmental Science course to replace an AP Environmental course or the student requests withdrawal from AP Chemistry and has already taken Chemistry I), the student will either remain in the class with a revised support plan or be withdrawn from the class with a “W”.

TRANSCRIPTS
APS uses Parchment to send official and unofficial copies of transcripts.  Click here for information about processing transcripts, or go directly to Parchment to create a profile.

Official transcripts will be sent electronically, securely and confidentially to the colleges, universities or organizations you designate. Students can track the status of their request online and immediately see if it is "Pending," "Sent" or "Delivered."  Official transcripts are primarily for college applications and the military.  Currently enrolled students can print unofficial transcripts from Parchment for personal use.  Unofficial transcripts can be used for job applications and as useful information in educational planning. 

 

GRADUATION INFORMATION

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
2013 Graduates and later - 25 Credit Plan (entered high school in 2009 or thereafter)

Course

Credits Required

English

4.0

Mathematics

4.0

Laboratory Science (See science section)

3.0

United States History & Geography

1.0

World History & Geography

1.0

Government

0.5

Economics

0.5

New Mexico History

0.5

Health

1.0

Electives*

9.0

Total

25

*Students must take:

  • one credit of an Advanced Placement or honors or dual credit or distance learning course
  • one unit of a career cluster course or workplace readiness course, or a language other than English.  (Most colleges and universities require 2-4 credits of the same modern, classical, or native language.)

DUAL CREDIT (Courses taken at CNM, UNM, SIPI or IAIA)
Dual Credit is one of the options for meeting a state graduation requirement.  Dual credit provides students with the opportunity to experience a college course and earn both college and high school credit.

The Dual Credit Program at Central New Mexico Community College (CNM) allows high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors the opportunity to earn college credit and, at the same time, high school credit. The University of New Mexico (UNM), Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) and the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) offer the same dual enrollment advantages to qualified juniors and seniors.  Students must be officially enrolled in APS at least half-time to qualify for dual credit enrollment.  APS pays for most required textbooks (which MUST be returned to the high school bookroom upon completion of the course).

NOT ALL CNM, UNM, SIPI and IAIA COURSES QUALIFY AS DUAL CREDIT COURSES.  Check with your Professional School Counselor or College and Career Readiness Counselor.  Remedial and non-APS approved courses are not tuition-free, textbooks are not provided for these classes, and they do not count for dual credit. 

For more information about Dual Credit:

HONORS AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS
The Honors and Advanced Placement Program is the most academically challenging curriculum that our district offers. These courses are available to all students. Honors courses in the freshman and sophomore years prepare students for Advanced Placement (AP) classes, most of which are offered at the junior and senior levels. AP courses are based on guidelines from the College Board and have been approved by the College Board.  These courses expose students to college-level curriculum, emphasize critical thinking skills, and provide preparation for the Advanced Placement examination. Students who earn a qualifying AP score on the Advanced Placement examination may earn college credit (credit varies among colleges).  Advanced Placement examinations are administered in May of each year.

Taking the Advanced Placement examination is highly recommended.  Most AP courses require an average of 1-2 hours of homework every night. Students should carefully consider their overall academic load when making course selections.

The schedule of classes offered is based on student requests.  Advanced Placement courses will be offered based on sufficient enrollment.  All Honors and Advanced Placement courses will be awarded a weighted grade.  An extra .025 will be added to the cumulative GPA for each semester of an Honors or Advanced Placement class successfully completed.  There is no limit to the number of Advanced Placement courses a student may take.

THE NEXT STEP PLAN
Completion and annual revision of a Next Step Plan (NSP) is a New Mexico Public Education Department graduation requirement. The purpose of the Next Step Plan is to involve pertinent people in each student’s life (the student, the student’s parent(s) or guardian(s), school counselor, school advisor, and others as appropriate) who work collaboratively with the student in developing goals and plans that prepare the student for a prospective career and personal future. The NSP is a living, working document, reviewed and updated annually, culminating during the 12th-grade year in a transition plan for a post-secondary or career-related future.

GRADE LEVEL CLASSIFICATION
Students must earn a set number of credits before they are classified at the next grade level.  The following table illustrates the number of credits required for classification at each grade level.

2016 Graduates and later (entered high school in 2010 or thereafter)

To Be Classified

Credits Needed

9th Grade

<6

10th Grade

6

11th Grade

13

12th Grade

19

Graduate

25

Every semester, the district reclassifies or promotes students who have not earned/earned enough credits to move to the next grade.

WAIVERS OF PE GRADUATION REQUIREMENT FOR MARCHING BAND AND J.R.O.T.C.
This waiver applies only to students enrolling as freshmen in 2017-2018 or later. Students completing two years of JROTC or two consecutive fall semesters of Marching Band may apply for a waiver for PE. All eighth-grade students who wish to fulfill the Physical Education graduation requirement through Band or ROTC will need to obtain and sign the “PE Graduation Requirement Waiver for Marching Band and JROTC” form no later than the first week of May during their eighth-grade year. If a student chooses to participate in PE at the time of pre-registration and later decides to waive the PE credit, the student and parent will need to schedule an appointment with their counselor within the first ten days of the school year to fill out the form and obtain a schedule change. Students will be scheduled into elective classes based on availability. If a student decides to withdraw from the Band or JROTC program before the completion of two years, they will need to arrange to take PE prior to graduation.

EARLY GRADUATES
Students who wish to graduate before their graduating class should be aware of the following requirements:

  1. Students must declare their plans to their school counselor during the period of time between the beginning of their sophomore year and before the start of the second semester of their junior year.
  2. Students must enroll in senior classes (English 12, a fourth math course, government and economics) during their graduating (3rd) year.  Failure to do so will jeopardize their plans for early graduation. Core courses within the same content area cannot be taken concurrently.
  3. Early graduates must take all high school assessments, as required by the Public Education Department, to earn a diploma.  Early graduates will be classified as juniors until the diploma is granted.
  4. Students completing graduation requirements at mid-year may participate in the spring commencement and receive their diplomas at that time.  Diplomas are not issued mid-year.

CLASS RANKING
After grade point averages (GPAs) are calculated for all students, the students in each graduating class are ranked in order and assigned their class rank.  The student with the highest GPA in a class is ranked number one in the class, the student with the next highest GPA is ranked number two, and so on.  Students with the same GPA receive the same rank.  The preliminary ranking for seniors is usually available shortly after October 1st.  The official ranking occurs after the 8th semester.  If you are applying for early college admission, simply indicate that official ranking will be available at a later date.

DIPLOMAS
Your registration name should appear on your school records and your diploma.  If your name is incorrect or misspelled, please notify the registrar.  A graduation list will be available in mid-spring before diplomas are ordered. Students are responsible for verifying that their names are on the list and spelled the way they want them to be printed on the diploma.

TESTING INFORMATION
To graduate from a New Mexico public high school, students must meet both coursework and assessment requirements. Currently, New Mexico Administrative Code (NMAC) establishes the standards-based assessment in mathematics, language arts, and science as the primary demonstration of competency for graduation. Students who do not demonstrate competency through the primary assessment requirements, may demonstrate postsecondary and/or workforce readiness from a menu of options provided by the NM Public Education Department or district designated demonstrations.   For the most complete and up-to-date information on Assessment and Graduation requirements, please visit the APS Assessment website

ACCESS: If your child is learning English, he/she will take the ACCESS test once a year, which takes about an hour. This assessment is required by the federal government and is used to determine your child's progress in English.


Other Assessments
All students are expected to participate in Final Exams for each course.  The final examination may count for no more than 20% of the final semester grade.  Other assessments of scholastic aptitude and vocational interests are available through the counseling office. 

Special Education IEP/504
Students with an IEP or who have a 504 Accommodations Plan have many testing accommodations available to them.  Graduation requirements, including passing scores on the exit exams, may vary for students with an Individualized Education Plan.  Contact our school’s Special Education department chair for more information.  Parents and teachers should discuss what is best for each student.

 

COLLEGE INFORMATION

COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS
Admission requirements vary widely among colleges and universities; consequently, students and their parents are urged to research entrance requirements for specific institutions. For example, some universities require a fine arts credit for admission; some colleges and universities calculate grade point average (GPA) for core courses only.  School counselors are helpful in providing college information. Students and parents are encouraged to visit the counseling link on the school website for more information.

Courses

 

Credits

English:

English or Honors/Advanced Placement

4

Math:

Algebra I or Honors Algebra I, Geometry or Honors Geometry, Algebra II or Honors Algebra II, a fourth credit of math

4

Social Studies:

US History and Geography or Advanced Placement US History,

  • World History and Geography or Advanced Placement World History,
  • Economics or Advanced Placement Microeconomics or Macroeconomics,
  • Government or Advanced Placement US Government and Politics,
  • New Mexico History

3.5

Science:

Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Advanced Placement Biology,

Advanced Placement Chemistry, Advanced Placement Physics

minimum 3/preferred 4

Modern, Classical or Native Language:

 

Most colleges require multiple years of the same language

minimum 2/ preferred 4

 Advanced Placement (AP) courses are recommended for college preparedness.  See the Advanced Placement course offerings in this catalog for options.

COLLEGE PREPARATION AND ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Students should obtain information from their prospective college to determine whether the school participates in and awards credit through the Advanced Placement (AP) and/or the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations.  Professional School Counselors and College and Career Readiness Counselors have more information on both programs. Please note, the CLEP option is for colleges and universities, not high schools.

Many colleges and universities participate in the College Board Advanced Placement Program.  The program grants advanced standing in courses and credit for college courses through AP examinations administered at our school in May of each year. Students may receive advanced placement or credit from a participating college or university based on their examination performance.

NEW MEXICO FIRST SEMESTER* AND LOTTERY SCHOLARSHIPS
*Based on 9/2014 information from post-secondary institutions; Post-secondary schools have different titles for this first semester scholarship (e.g., Bridge Scholarship, NM Lottery Success Scholarship and NM Legislative Lottery Scholarship).

IMPORTANT NOTE:  New Mexico post-secondary institutions have different criteria for accessing this scholarship money (different admission deadlines for receiving these awards, semesters in which these awards can be used, exams that must be taken prior to receiving the awards, financial aid applications that must be completed prior to receiving the awards, etc.). Students should check with the post-secondary institution to which they are applying for scholarship criteria.  More information on New Mexico Lottery Scholarships can be found at this link

Students have an opportunity to earn a first semester scholarship to New Mexico public post-secondary institutions of higher education.  Priority consideration for the scholarship is given based on application completion deadlines that vary by institution. 

To earn this scholarship, students must:                                                                         

  • be a New Mexico high school graduate,
  • have a high school GPA as determined by the post-secondary institution,
  • be a New Mexico resident,
  • complete admission requirements and be admitted to a New Mexico public post-secondary institution of higher education and
  • enroll in a degree granting program with at least 12 credit hours for CNM or a NM two-year college OR 15 credit hours for UNM or other NM four-year institutions.

The New Mexico State Lottery Scholarship is a tuition scholarship for New Mexico high school graduates attending a New Mexico public post-secondary institution of higher education.  The scholarship covers tuition and may or may not include fees.  It is available for up to seven consecutive semesters or until the student graduates, whichever comes first.  Only four semesters may be used at a two-year institution.  In order to qualify for the Lottery Scholarship. You must (at minimum):

  • Student must be a resident of New Mexico.
  • Student must have completed high school at a public or accredited private New Mexico high school, graduated from a public or accredited private New Mexico high school or received a high school equivalency credential while maintaining residency in New Mexico.
  • Student must enroll at a public post-secondary educational institution in New Mexico within sixteen months of graduation or receipt of a high equivalency credential.
  • Student must enroll in and earn 15 credit hours per semester at a four-year New Mexico public university.
  • Student must enroll in and earn 12 credit hours per semester at a two- year New Mexico public community college.
  • Student must maintain a 2.5 or greater cumulative grade point average (GPA) each semester of enrollment.

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION – NCAA
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) requirements apply to students who plan to participate in athletics at the college level.  The NCAA was established in 1906 and serves as the athletics governing body for more than 1,300 colleges, universities, conferences and organizations.  The national office is in Indianapolis, but the member colleges and universities develop the rules and guidelines for athletics eligibility and athletics competition for each of the three NCAA divisions: Division I, Division II, and Division III.  One of the differences among the three divisions is that colleges and universities in Division I and II may offer athletic scholarships, while Division III colleges and universities may not. NCAA guidelines specify which courses qualify as NCAA core courses and what college entrance scores and grade-point averages are required to participate in college athletics.  Not all Math, online, virtual, software-based credit recovery, independent study and correspondence courses meet NCAA guidelines in order to qualify as NCAA core credit.  Students are responsible for adherence to NCAA course guidelines.  Athletes should consult with the Athletic Director or school counselor for assistance.  For more information, visit the NCAA Eligibility Center website 

 

Courses

 

Electives

 

  • AP Computer Science Principals — Semester 1 and 2 – New!

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES Students will explore the foundations of computer science using videos, hands-on activities, programming, investigations, and projects. They will experience much of what computer programmers do in planning, developing, testing, and refining software. Security is a key topic, and students will learn techniques for recognizing and guarding against security threats. Every unit has two to three projects, giving students the opportunity not only to write programs, but also to develop security policies, analyze real-world data, solve network problems, plan a mobile app, and more. Interwoven throughout the course are spotlights on a wide variety of careers and roles in computer science. Students will need to access to Python to complete this course. Required: Algebra I completed. Suggested: an introductory computer science class of one or more of the topics mentioned above taken prior to signing up for AP Computer Science Principles **Note: AP computer principles can count as a 4th year math

 

  • AP Psychology — Semester 1 and 2 – New!

53041de1 53041de2 ½ credit semester 11-12

The AP Psychology course introduces the student to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. The student is exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major fields within psychology (e.g., biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, states of consciousness, developmental psychology, personality, experimental and correlational design, abnormal psychology, treatment of psychological disorders, ethical use of data). The student also learns about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Literacy strategies and techniques are integrated throughout the curriculum. This course is recommended for college-bound students. College credit can be earned with the successful completion of the AP test.

  • Art Appreciation — Semesters 1 and 2

            70031de1 70032de2 ½ credit semester 11-12

Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, this course encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, Intro to Art provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400.

  • Academic Career Exploration I and II — Semesters 1 and 2

53060DE1 53060DE2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 10-12

53061DE1 53061DE2 1 Credit/Semester 10-12

Through work experiences as supported by a portfolio, the student explores personal and career interests, aptitudes and abilities. Personal management of time, health, and finances are also included. The necessary components of a productive and successful career are examined: technical knowledge, responsible and ethical behavior, and goal setting. Literacy strategies are integrated throughout the course. Skills and knowledge acquired in this course can be applied to all of the career clusters and their respective pathways.

  • Computer Science Principles — Semester 1 and 2 – New!

COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLE Students will explore the foundations of computer science using videos, hands-on activities, programming, investigations, and projects. They will experience much of what computer programmers do in planning, developing, testing, and refining software. Security is a key topic, and students will learn techniques for recognizing and guarding against security threats. Every unit has two to three projects, giving students the opportunity not only to write programs, but also to develop security policies, analyze real-world data, solve network problems, plan a mobile app, and more. Interwoven throughout the course are spotlights on a wide variety of careers and roles in computer science. Students will need to access to Python to complete this course. 

  • Introduction to Computer Science — Semester 1 and 2 – New!

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE Introduction to Computer Science is a year-long course for students in grades 9-10, although any students in grades 9-12 may enroll. This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. Students have creative, learning opportunities to create a computer program, develop a web page, design a mobile app, write algorithms, while building a strong foundational knowledge base. This course provides a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills they can use immediately. Required Materials: Activities in this course require that Python is installed on students’ computers.

 

  • Computer Networks — Semester 1 and 2 – New!

697111de1 697112de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

 

This course introduces students to the fundamental technology and concepts that make networking systems possible. The most important concept introduced is that of the OSI reference model and its bottom four layers, which are most directly concerned with networking instead of computing. The course explores the software and hardware supporting LANs, WANs, and Wi-Fi networks. Students are introduced to the protocols in the TCP/IP stack that are used to communicate across a network, and to networking hardware, including hubs, switches, bridges, routers, and transmission media. Students explore questions of security, network management, and network operating systems.

  • Engineering and Design — Semester 1 and 2 – New!

460001de1 460002de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

 

This semester-long course focuses on building real-world problem solving and critical thinking skills as students learn how to innovate and design new products and improve existing products. Students are introduced to the engineering design process to build new products and to the reverse engineering process, which enables engineers to adjust any existing product. Students identify how engineering and design have a direct impact on the sustainability of our environment and the greening of our economy. Finally, students incorporate the engineering design process, environmental life cycle, and green engineering principles to create a decision matrix to learn how to solve environmental issues.

  • French I — Semester 1 and 2

60010de1 60010de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

Language acquisition is a developmental process. Over time learners develop the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner. French I introduces students to the basic skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—and to the basic structures of French taught within the cultural context. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, cultures, language functions, connections and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on oral, written, communication skills, and cultural activities.

  • French II — Semester 1 and 2

60011de1 60011de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French I with a grade of “C” or better in French I, or teacher approval.

Language acquisition is a developmental process aimed at the ultimate goal of communication. Over time the students develop the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner. French II continues the focus on the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as encourages deeper appreciation of the French culture and language. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, cultures, language functions, connections and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on applying oral, written and communication skills to personal, academic, and cultural activities.

  • Latin I — Semester 1 and 2

61510de1 61510de2 ½ credit Semester 9-12

Latin course exposes students to the Latin language and culture, usually through a series of sequential courses.  First year courses emphasize basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the influence of Latin in current English words.  Students will be able to read and write in Latin on a basic level.  Second year courses enable students to expand upon what they have learned, increasing their skills and depth of knowledge.  Third  and fourth year Latin courses typically focus on having students express more complex concepts in writing, and comprehend and react to original Latin texts.

  • Physical Education - Semester 1 and 2

900001  900002  1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

The student is required to have a suitable change of clothing and shoes.

Students enrolled in this class will have a suitable change of clothing and shoes. Description: This course is a requirement for graduation and is a prerequisite for all elective physical education courses. Foundations of physical education will be the focus with an emphasis on fitness concepts and activity objectives (skill, knowledge, and attitude) that will contribute to a lifetime commitment to activity and fitness.

  • Psychology — Semester 1 and 2

53040DE1 53040de2 ½ credit Semester 10-12

Psychology is the scientific study of the behavior of individuals and their mental processes. This course attempts to make a meaningful understanding of psychology in the student’s individual life. Areas of study include, but are not limited to, approaches and methods; brain, body and behavior; personality and human growth; consciousness and altered states; and psychological disorders and treatment. Literacy strategies are integrated throughout the curriculum.

  • Sociology — Semester 1 and 2

16041de1 16041de2 ½ credit Semester 9-12

Course introduces students to the study of human behavior in society.  These courses provide an overview of sociology, generally including (but not limited to) topics such as social institutions and norms, socialization and social change, and the relationships of individuals and groups in society.

  • Spanish I — Semester 1 and 2

61010de1 61010de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

Language acquisition is a developmental process. Over time these learners develop the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner. Spanish I introduces students to the basic skills- listening, speaking, reading, and writing – and to the basic structures of Spanish taught within the cultural context. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, cultures, language functions, connections, and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on oral, written, communication skills, and cultural activities.

  • Spanish II — Semester 1 and 2

61011de1 61011de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I.
“C” or better in Spanish I and permission of instructor

Language acquisition is a developmental process aimed at the ultimate goal of communication. Over time the students develop the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner. Spanish II continues the focus on the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as encourages deeper appreciation of the Spanish culture and language. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, cultures, language functions, connections and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on applying oral and written communication skills to personal, academic and cultural activities.

  • Spanish III — Semester 1 and 2

61012de1 61012de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish II or equivalent, teacher recommendation “C” or better in Spanish II and permission of instructor.

Language acquisition is a developmental process aimed at the ultimate goal of communication. Over time the student develops the ability to write and speak in a meaningful and appropriate manner. Spanish III reinforces and intensifies language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as encourages deeper appreciation of the Spanish culture and language. Areas of study include expression, comprehension, language and culture, cultures, language functions, connections and personal applications. Emphasis is placed on applying oral and written communication skills to personal, academic and cultural activities.

English

  • English 9 — Semester 1 and 2

25031de1 25031de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9

English 9 emphasizes skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students review grammar, mechanics, usage, sentence structure, and paragraph development in their writing. In English 9, the student surveys the underpinning elements of various types of literature from around the world. The student recognizes and understands the concepts of theme, plot, characterization, point of view, explores various genres and the unique characteristics of each (e.g. the oral tradition, poetry, prose, fiction, non-fiction, drama, the novel) and reads numerous selections by a wide variety of authors. Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool.

  • English 9 Honors — Semester 1 and 2

25034de1 25034de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9

It is strongly suggested that students are reading significantly above grade level, have superior writing and organizational skills as demonstrated by testing, have an “A” or “B” in eighth grade language arts in the first semester, and have teacher recommendation. We strongly recommend that students be reading at or above grade level. Students who are not highly motivated to be involved in a rigorous Honors English program should consider English 9 while acclimating to the demands of the total high school curriculum.

Description: In English 9 Honors, the student surveys the underpinning elements of various types of literature from around the world. The student recognizes and understands the concept of theme, explores various genres and the unique characteristics of each (e.g. the oral tradition, poetry, prose, fiction, non-fiction, drama, the novel) and reads numerous selections by a wide variety of authors. Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool.

  • English 10 — Semester 1 and 2

25041de1 25041de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 10

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of English 9 (or substitute)

In English 10, the student surveys and samples a wide variety of multicultural literature of the world from diverse authors, various time periods, and various genres. The student studies and considers a broad spectrum of themes and perspectives from around the globe and makes connections to his or her own ancestry and to the ancestry of other peoples of the world. Regardless of the approach(s) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool.

  • English 10 Honors — Semester 1 and 2

25044de1 25044de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 10

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 9 or equivalent (“B” or above).

Special Requirements: It is strongly recommended that students are reading considerably above grade level, have superior writing skills, have at least a “B” average in previous English classes, and have teacher recommendation.

Description: In English 10 Honors, the student surveys and samples a wide variety of multicultural literatures of the world from diverse authors, various time periods, and various genres. The student studies and considers a broad spectrum of themes and perspectives from around the globe and makes connections to his or her own ancestry and to the ancestry of other peoples of the world. Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool. This course earns a weighted grade.

  • English 11 — Semester 1 and 2

25051de1 25051de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 11

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of English 10

In English 11, the student surveys selections of the literary history of America using a particular approach designed by the teacher and supported with appropriate instructional materials. With a chronological approach, the student surveys selected samples from the Colonial Period (1607-1765) to the Post-Modern Period (1970 – Present) including political and social history and literary movements within each period. With a thematic approach, the student surveys selections of American literature across time grouped by themes, (e.g., Struggle for Independence, the American Dream, Individual Thought and Action.) With a genre approach, the student surveys various time periods and themes in American literature through selected genres across time periods (e.g., early journals, poetry, verse, sermons, oratory, short stories, novels, and plays). With a humanities or interdisciplinary approach, the student makes connections to corresponding time periods and themes.

  • English 11 AP — Semester 1 and 2

25058de1 25058de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 11

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10.

AP English Language & Composition is for students who demonstrate the highest level of ability and interest in language arts. AP students need a strong work ethic and willingness to complete challenging assignments. Students will focus on rhetorical analysis of mostly non-fiction texts recommended by the College Board Advanced Placement program, the argument, analysis, and the synthesis-essay. AP English Language & Composition is a weighted course that includes preparation for the AP exam in English Language and Composition. Students are expected to sit for the AP Language and Composition exam. In AP English Language & Composition the student surveys selections of the literary history of America using a particular approach designed by the teacher and supported with appropriate instructional materials. With a chronological approach, the student surveys selected samples from the Colonial Period (1607-1765) to the Post-Modern Period (1970 – Present) including political and social history and literary movements within each period. With a thematic approach, the student surveys selections of American literature across time periods that are grouped by themes, (e.g. Struggle for Independence, the American Dream, Individual Thought and Action, etc.). With a genre approach, the student surveys various time periods and themes in American literature through selected genres across time periods (e.g. early journals, poetry, verse, sermons, oratory, short stories, novels, and plays, etc.). Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool. This course earns a weighted grade.

  • English 12 — Semester 1 and 2

25061de1 25061de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of English 11 (or substitute)

In English 12, the student surveys selections of the literary history of the world/Great Britain using a particular approach designed by the teacher and supported with appropriate instructional materials. With a chronological approach, the student surveys selected samples from B.C. –A.D. 428 to the present including political and social history and literary movements within each period, (e.g. Celtic and Roman, The Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Age of Reason, Romantics, Victorians, Modern, etc.). With a thematic approach, the student surveys selections of world/British literature across time grouped by themes (Storytelling, Expanding Horizons, Conflict and Turning Points, etc.). With a genre approach, the student surveys various time periods and themes in world literature through selected genres across time periods (e.g. mythology, legends, epics, journals, poetry, verse, plays, novels, short stories, etc.). With a humanities or interdisciplinary approach, the student makes connections to corresponding time periods and themes through the study of World History and/or other subject areas. Regardless of the approach(s) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool.

  • English 12 AP — Semester 1 and 2

25064de1 25064de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of English 11 (or substitute)

AP English Literature & Composition is for students who demonstrate the highest level of ability and interest in language arts. Students read works of world literature recommended by the College Board Advanced Placement program and prepare for the Advanced Placement exam(s). Literary analysis is the major focus of this class. In AP English Literature & Composition, the student surveys selections of the literary history of the world/Great Britain using a particular approach designed by the teacher and supported with appropriate instructional materials. With a chronological approach, the student surveys selected samples from B.C.-A.D. 428 to the present including political and social history and literary movements within each period, (e.g. Celtic and Roman, The Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Age of Reason, Romantics, Victorians, Modern, etc.). With a thematic approach, the student surveys selections of world/British literature across time grouped by themes (Storytelling, Expanding Horizons, Conflict and Turning Points, etc.). With a genre approach, the student surveys various time periods and themes in world literature through selected genres across time periods (e.g. mythology, legends, epics, journals, poetry, verse, plays, novels, short stories, etc.). Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool. This course earns a weighted grade.

Math

  • Algebra I — Semester 1 and 2

33040de1 33040de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9 - 12

In Algebra I the student develops an understanding of the basic structure and language of Algebra, a tool used to represent and solve a variety of real-world situations. The student uses tables, models, and graphs to interpret algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities to analyze functions. In addition, the student uses calculators, computers, and graphing utilities in problem solving. Other areas of study are global processes, geometry, and data analysis and probability.

  • Algebra I Honors — Semester 1 and 2

33080de1  33080de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9

It is strongly recommended that students have “85%” or better in 8th grade enriched or accelerated programs, “85%” or better in 8th grade Intro-Algebra, and teacher recommendation.

Algebra, which can be described as the language of mathematics, is the foundation of all advanced mathematics. It is the first mathematics course that teaches the basic structure and abstract nature of mathematics. The Honors Algebra I course is designed for the student with exceptional ability and interest in mathematics. Students will develop concepts, techniques and theory in greater depth than the Algebra I course. Both acceleration and enrichment are integral components of the curriculum. This is the first course in the Honors/Advanced Placement Program in mathematics and students will earn a weighted grade in this course.

  • Algebra II — Semester 1 and 2

36040de1 36040de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

Successful Completion of Algebra I and/or Geometry or Equivalents

This course requires student access to a graphing calculator.

In Algebra II the student learns to extend and develop the concepts studied in Algebra I and Geometry and is introduced to more advanced topics such as relations, functions, conic sections, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Also, he/she pays more attention to the study of systems of equations including quadratic systems, inequalities, and absolute value relations. Other areas of study are geometry and data analysis and probability. The student applies problem-solving techniques throughout the course as an integral part of the subject.

  • Algebra II Honors — Semester 1 and 2

36080de1 36080de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

It is strongly recommended that students have successfully completed Honors Geometry and teacher recommendation.

Students will learn extensions of algebraic concepts with special attention to analytic geometry; trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series. Both acceleration and enrichment are integral components of the curriculum. This is the third course in the Honors/Advanced Placement Program in mathematics and students will earn a weighted grade.

  • AP Calculus — Semester 1 and 2

38080de1 38080de2 ½ credit Semester 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or Honors Algebra II with an 85% or better. Teacher approval required.


Special Requirements: Students will be expected to have a calculator with power, root, trig, log, and inverse functions and must have access to a graphing calculator. Although the Advanced Placement examination is not a course requirement, students are encouraged to take the exam. In AP Calculus AB, the student studies limits, differentiation, and definite and indefinite integration of functions and relations. The student develops ideas from analysis throughout AP Calculus AB. The course prepares the student for the AB level Advanced Placement Exam in Calculus and as a result includes an extensive review of relevant topics. Note: This calculus course consists of a full high school academic year of work that is comparable to a college-level calculus course. Students should have demonstrated mastery of material from algebra, geometry, coordinate geometry, and trigonometry, with study in areas to include, but not limited to, advanced topics in algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry and elementary functions that are linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric and piecewise defined. The student is expected to seek college credit, college placement, or both from the college of his/her choice. The student is required to use a graphing calculator and must have access to the graphing calculator at school and at home. The student must agree to participate in at least one organized mathematics competition held in the district.

  • AP Statistics — Semester 1 and 2– New!

38080de1 38080de2 ½ credit Semester 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II with “B” or higher and excellent

communication skills. Special Requirements: It is strongly recommended that the student have access to a graphing calculator. Advanced Placement Statistics introduces the student to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data using these four broad themes: 1. Exploration: Observing patterns and departure from patterns 2. Study design 3. Producing models using probability theory and simulation 4. Statistical inference This course uses an interactive data collection approach using the text and lessons as resources and addresses the standards presented by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). The student applies his/her knowledge of algebra and geometry to linear transformation of data, conducting surveys, and analyzing the results. The student builds his/her own studies using both proper and improper data analysis techniques, critique studies conducted by other students and entities, and makes suggested improvements. This AP Statistics course is taught as an activity-based course in which students engage in investigations and projects to focus on data and statistical thinking. Emphasis is placed on effectively communicating how methods, results, and interpretations of data for any given problem are valid. On most assignments, quizzes, exams, projects and investigations, students are expected to use a graphing calculator. This allows students to focus on statistical concepts rather than on calculations. Instructions on technology, with particular emphasis on the TI-83/TI-84 calculator, are incorporated into lectures as well as regular class activities and investigations. Topics include “Exploring Data,” “Planning and Design of a Study,” “Anticipating Patterns,” and “Statistical Inference.” Students will earn a weighted grade.

  • Financial Literacy — Semester 1 and 2

38012de1 38012de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

Financial Literacy as a mathematics course satisfies the fourth year mathematics requirement and is designed to apply algebra, geometry, and consumer topics to real life. The student gains an understanding of finance in mathematical terms and gains confidence in his/her ability to manage money as it pertains to his/her personal life. Topics include, but are not limited to, saving and investing, banking and other financial services, credit and debt, income taxes, insurance and risk management, money management, and planning for retirement. The student acquires the consumer skills necessary to function productively and responsibly as he/she embarks on a new life that prepares him/her for a career, post graduate studies, the world of work, and independent living. Literacy and technology skills are integrated throughout the course. The skills and knowledge gained through this course can be applied to any career cluster as they are life skills that can ensure a student’s success in daily activities that require crucial decisions that affect him/her personally.

  • Geometry — Semester 1 and 2

35040de1 35040de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

Successful Completion of Algebra I
This course requires student access to a graphing calculator

In Geometry the student learns abstract and logical thinking through inductive and deductive reasoning. The student uses lines, planes, polygons, circles, and three-dimensional figures for representing and solving a variety of problems. The student uses calculators, computers and software programs (e.g., Geometer’s Sketchpad, Cabri Geometry), construction tools (e.g., compass, protractor, straight edge), and graphing utilities as tools in problem solving. Other areas of study include global processes; algebra, functions, and graphs; and data analysis and probability. Literacy strategies are integrated throughout the curriculum.

  • Geometry Honors — Semester 1 and 2

35080de1 35080de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

It is strongly recommended that students have “B” or better in High School Honors Algebra I or “A” (95-100) in 8th grade Honors Algebra I, or (95-100) in High School Algebra I (the itinerant program) and teacher recommendation.

Students will study, in greater depth, the concepts, techniques, and theory of the regular geometry course. Both acceleration and enrichment are integral components of the curriculum. Acceleration will allow time for the extension of algebraic concepts. This is the second course in the Honors/Advanced Placement Program in mathematics and students will earn a weighted grade in this course.

  • Pre-Calculus — Semester 1 and 2

38040de1 38040de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II with a “B: or better, or a high “C” with teacher recommendation.

Students will be expected to have access to a calculator with power, root, trig, log, and inverse functions. A graphing calculator would be preferred but is not necessary.

In Pre-Calculus the student applies advanced algebraic concepts and problem-solving techniques, with and without technology, to find the solution of polynomial equations and inequalities. Areas of study are linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs, systems of equations and inequalities, technical literacy, trigonometry using rectangular and polar graphs, conic sections, sequences and series, probability and statistics, and limits. The student uses reasoning skills to investigate application models. Pre-Calculus unifies and extends the mathematics studied in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry and applies it to the study of polynomial, logarithmic, trigonometric, and exponential functions.

  • Probability and Statistics — Semester 1 and 2

38023de1 38023de2 ½ credit/Semester 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or equivalent with a C or better.
Special Requirements: This course requires student access to a graphing calculator.

Description: Statistics presents the concepts of statistics and probability in a simplified manner. The course is devoted to the analysis of data sets, the interpretation of the data, and the use of computers to aid problem solving. Throughout the course, the student sees the practicality statistics has in several content areas, as well as in everyday life. Literacy strategies (e.g., reading, writing, speaking) are integrated throughout the curriculum.

 

Science

  • AP Biology — Semester 1 and 2

441311de1 441312de2 ½ credit Semester 11-12

Prerequisite: Completion of Biology and Chemistry with a minimum grade of “C.”

 

The Advanced Placement Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course taken by biology majors. It is an intense course of study stressing strong study skills, critical thinking skills, and time management skills. Topics of study include molecules, cells, Mendelian and molecular genetics, evolution, and ecology. Laboratory work is strongly emphasized, including DNA biotechnology, biochemistry, and population dynamics. At the completion of this course, the student is strongly encouraged to take the AP exam. The student who demonstrates sufficient qualification on this exam may receive college level credit for multiple college courses. The students earn a weighted grade for this course.

  • AP Environmental Science — Semester 1 and 2

44135de1 44135de2 ½ credit Semester 10-12

Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra I, Biology I, and Chemistry I are highly recommended.
Special Requirements: As suggested summer reading, the teacher will provide a list of current scientific articles and books from scientific publications.
Description: This laboratory class is designed to provide the student with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand, identify, and analyze environmental problems both natural and man-made, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. The course is interdisciplinary, covering topics in the fields of geology, biology, chemistry, geography, and physics. The student examines the following themes: science is a process; energy conversions underlie all ecological processes; the Earth itself is one interconnected system; humans alter natural systems; environmental problems have cultural and social contexts; and human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

  • Biology I — Semester 1 and 2

41111de1 41111de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9

This laboratory course is designed to prepare the student for higher-level life science courses, including but not limited to AP Biology. Biology I is designed to introduce important biological concepts and lab procedures in a manner accessible to all students. Topics covered included but not limited to, cell structure and function, biochemistry, genetics, ecology, evolution, taxonomy, and certain aspects of earth science.

  • Chemistry I — Semester 1 and 2

42111de1 42111de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 10

It is strongly recommended that the student has successfully completed Algebra I prior to taking Chemistry I. This course will meet college entrance requirements.

This laboratory course is designed so the student studies chemistry and its applications, especially as applied to the impact on society. He/She investigates substances and how they react with one another. Concepts of study include, but are not limited to, scientific measurement, properties and structure of matter, atomic theory, classification and periodic trends, ionic and covalent bonding, chemical reactions, energy, nuclear chemistry, acids and bases, and solutions. In addition, the student studies how chemistry and Earth and space science are related. Concepts include, but are not limited to, electromagnetic radiation, radioactivity, the structure of the Earth, and groundwater. Scientific thinking and practice (e.g., extensive laboratory activities, critical thinking, and problem solving), science and society, and literacy are integrated throughout all science courses.

  • Geology/Astronomy — Semester 1 and 2

43143de1 43143de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9-12

This laboratory course is designed to acquaint the student with the study of geology and astronomy and their related fields. The course emphasizes historical and physical geology. Topics may include paleontology, geologic time, plate tectonics, and map reading. Astronomy topics may include planetary geology and evolution of the stars and universe. The student examines scientific thinking and practices and how science impacts individuals, society, and New Mexico.

Literacy strategies (e.g., reading, writing, speaking, research) are integrated throughout the curriculum.

  • Health Education I

48010de 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9

Health Education I is a one-half credit required course for all APS high school students. The course is designed to meet national, state, and district standards and benchmarks. The core curriculum addresses all aspects of health and wellness and consists of learning experiences that emphasize increased awareness of health behaviors and their positive and negative consequences. Students will achieve knowledge and the ability to develop an increased awareness of attitudes, life skills, behaviors, and decision-making skills related to health and healthy lifestyle practices.

  • Physics I — Semester 1 and 2

43111de1 43111de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 11

This laboratory course is designed as a study of the relationships between matter and energy. The student investigates topics of study that include, but are not restricted to the principles of motion, gravitation, heat, light, sound, electricity and magnetism, forces of nature, plate tectonics, and cosmology. As appropriate, these topics are examined at scales ranging from atomic to astronomical. The focus is on conceptual understanding and practical applications. Literacy strategies are integrated throughout the curriculum.

 

Social Studies

  • AP World History & Geography — Semester 1 and 2

12013de1 12013de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 10

The student is encouraged to take the Advanced Placement examination. Many universities and colleges consider successful completion of the class and taking the exam as evidence of an academic commitment. Depending on the student’s score and the policy of the university or college, the student may receive college credits. The student earns a weighted grade for this course.

Advanced Placement World History emphasizes the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. The course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, focuses primarily on the past thousand years of global experience. This course highlights the nature of change and continuity in international frameworks, their causes and consequences. The student uses critical- thinking skills to demonstrate an understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in world history. The course emphasizes and develops close reading, writing, and research skills that are necessary for success in the class.

The course’s intent is to aid students in passing the AP test at a level that will allow them to receive 3-6 college credits.

  • AP United States History — Semester 1 and 2

11013de1 11013de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 11

The student is encouraged to take the Advanced Placement examination. Many universities and colleges consider successful completion of the class and taking the exam as evidence of an academic commitment. Depending on the student’s score and the policy of the university or college, the student may receive college credits. The student earns a weighted grade for this course.

Advanced Placement U.S. History & Geography is a comprehensive course that covers the Discovery and Settlement of the New World to the Twenty-first Century. Major emphasis is placed on American society, culture, politics, and economics. The student uses critical thinking skills to demonstrate understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States. The course emphasizes and develops close reading, writing, and research skills that are necessary for success in the class. AP United States History & Geography fulfills the U.S. History requirement for graduation. The course’s intent is to aid students in passing the AP test at a level that will allow them to receive 3-6 college credits.

  • AP Government – New!

13016 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

U.S. Government and Politics AP is a required course that provides the student with a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the United States Constitution. The Advanced Placement course in U.S. Government and Politics gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. The course builds a familiarity with various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. The student becomes acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. The student analyzes the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government. In addition, He or she examines his/her rights and responsibilities as a citizen and how to exercise them as well as experience the political process at local state, and national levels of governments. Note: The student is encouraged to take the Advanced Placement examination. Many universities and colleges consider successful completion of the class and taking the exam as evidence of an academic commitment. Depending on the student’s score and the policy of the university or college, the student may receive college credits.

  • Economics

15011DE 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

Economics is a semester course with an emphasis on the allocation of scarce resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies and by people in various economic roles. The student examines topics such as scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, money, the role of financial institutions, and international trade.

  • Government

13011DE 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 12

Government is a required course that provides the student with a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the United States Constitution. The student analyzes the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government. In addition, he/she examines his/her rights and responsibilities as a citizen and how to exercise them as well as experience the political process at local state, and national levels of governments.

  • New Mexico History

New Mexico History
10043de 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 9

New Mexico History is a semester-long survey course of the political, economic, social, cultural, and geographical features of New Mexico with an emphasis on the 20th century to the present. The student analyzes the role that New Mexico plays in national and international arenas. He/She applies and reconstructs his/her knowledge of the past to develop a historical perspective and uses that perspective when examining relationships of the political, economic, social, and cultural issues of today.

  • United States History — Semester 1 and 2

11011de1 11011de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 11

United States History and Geography is a survey course with a focus on post-Reconstruction United States (1877 – Present). Major emphasis is placed on American society, culture, and politics. The student uses critical thinking skills to demonstrate understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States.

  • World History & Geography — Semester 1 and 2

12019de1 12019de2 1⁄2 Credit/Semester 10

World History encompasses the study of diverse regions, cultures, communities, religions, institutions, and their development, growth, and interactions since the Renaissance. This course emphasizes continuity, as well as changes over time, and the outcomes produced by these processes. Themes include the development of economic, social, technological, and political trends, culminating in our present world. Reading, writing, speaking and research strategies are integrated throughout the course.